Let It Snow; Let Us Slow

 wfmw.jpg[IMPORTANT UPDATE: For step-by-step instructions with photos on how to fix overnight crockpot oatmeal using the double-boiler/bain-marie method, please click to the how-to post I created exclusively about that (if you read this post, and you’re welcome to, you will first read a long story–a pleasant one that you might enjoy–before arriving at the crockpot oatmeal instructions you’re looking for; and this set of instructions has no photos).]Two days ago a snowstorm loomed, an inevitable event. Snow and sleet were inching toward us on the weather radar; there was no escape. Neither The Belgian Wonder nor I have careers that require us to endanger our lives for the good of mankind, like nurses, snowplow drivers, and Blockbuster employees, so we simply stocked up on milk and toilet paper, drove home, and watched for our kids’ school to scroll across the screen under “closings and cancellations.”Earlier in the day, before the storm hit, I selected several movies from the library. I imagined our little family in jammies, cozy by the fire, listening to music, reading, watching a movie or two, or three. I actually liked the idea of slowing. Relaxing. A forced rest.We don’t rest much anymore, not as much as I want to, as a family or as a culture. This year we have had to take care not to get swept up in activities that would have us rushing–speeding–through life. Being snowbound sounded like the perfect excuse to simply stop.The day of the storm, I stood at the window sipping hot tea, watching snow and sleet slam against the sides of our house, weigh the branches of the fir trees and coat the slides. The kids went out before the temperatures plummeted and stomped around towing sleds and throwing snowballs. Within hours their footsteps were filled again. The Belgian Wonder worked hard shoveling, but the wind undid much of his work by teasing drifts across the cleared path in eerie white mists, shifting, like spirits dancing along the edges of his efforts. We were being forced inside.Inside again today, we prepare for our Family LoveFest, our day to celebrate us. School’s canceled, so we anticipate games and popcorn, hand-drawn love notes scrawled on pink construction paper, a special dinner with angelfood cake for dessert–dressed with pink icing–and lots of M&Ms.The weather outside is frightful, but I think we’ll just light the fire. And since we’ve nowhere to go, let it snow. Let it snow, and let us slow.With that, let me share with you instructions for making crockpot steel-cut oatmeal, perfect for a blizzardy, slow-motion Valentine’s Day morning when you crave something warm for breakfast. Plus, the fiber helps balance out the excessive amounts of chocolate to be consumed throughout the day.To avoid scorching the oatmeal or wasting some as it forms a crusty ring around the crock, create a bain-marie.Put the oats, salt and water used to make the oatmeal into a bowl that fits within the crockpot. Fill the crockpot itself with water and set the oats-bowl inside so that the “bath” water comes about halfway up the side. Set the crockpot on low and it cooks overnight.Slow food for a slow snow day.Happy Valentine’s Day.Please visit Rocks in My Dryer for more great ideas!

My previous Works-For-Me-Wednesday Ideas:Family LoveFestJoy of Lifelong Learning–For Free!MP3 AccompanistMP3 Note-taking

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  • Comments

    1. I have been thinking about getting a crock pot. I just have been hesitant because nearly every recipe I have seen has cream soup as a base, and I am trying to avoid that. This is one that I would like. Hmmm…

    2. What a great idea. I love to use my crockpot, and I have seen recipes for oatmeal before, but never heard of a bain-marie. Same concept as a double-boiler. I’ll have to try it out.

      Thanks!

    3. The title of your post intrigued me … I feel like I need to slow down more often!

      Thanks for your thoughts and thanks for your recipe.

      I hope you have a wonderful family fest day. Happy Valentine’s Day!

    4. I love the idea of crockpot oatmeal that’s waiting for me in the morning.

      We’re enjoying a snow day, slow day as well.

    5. What a great post, Ann.

      I like when the snow says “Go in the house. And stay there until I tell you you can come out again.”

      The wordsmith in me read and re-read this wonderful line of yours:

      …the wind undid much of his work by teasing drifts across the cleared path in eerie white mists, shifting, like spirits dancing along the edges of his efforts. We were being forced inside.

      :-D Excellent!

      Hope you all can enjoy the slow-zone for a little while!

      Phil—

    6. Jane: I love my crockpot! I’m a lazy cook and like meals to be as simple and painless as possible. Something about sticking stuff in the crockpot in the morning makes dinnertime seem totally simplified. We stick a big roast in there in the morning with a splash of red wine, some sea salt sprinkled on top, maybe some other spices (maybe not) and after cooking on low all day we’ve got tender beef for dinner (no cream sauce!). My kids don’t eat cooked carrots or potatoes, or else I’d stick those in the pot, too. You can also layer lasagna in a crockpot. A whole chicken on top of tin-foil wads to get it up off the bottom of the crock–it ends up looking roasted. Soups. Chili. With a little googling, you might be convinced to give it a try (I got a great one at Goodwill. You could look there if you don’t want to spend a lot while you experiment–if you decide you like it, you can buy a nicer new one).

    7. Phil: Life in the slow-zone. I like that. Thanks for your words of encouragement–it’s easy to see why you’re called to be a pastor!

    8. Love the oatmeal in slow-cooker idea… I, too, love my slow-cooker! Such a time-saver when caring for two one-year-olds!

    9. I agree–I love the chance to slow down when we have no place to go.

    10. Seabird: Twins one-year-olds! Wow, do you need to borrow a second crockpot?

      Jennifer: This week I’ve thought about it a lot–how often do we have no place to go? Hardly ever! Even weekends can fill up more than I’d like. It takes terrific self-control to say “no” to things to preserve little windows of slowing.

    11. Wait; slow down. You’re going too fast. It’s all relative.

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    1. […] Let It Snow, Let Us Slow (Crockpot Steel-Cut Oatmeal) […]

    2. […] Let It Snow, Let Us Slow (Crockpot Steel-Cut Oatmeal) […]

    3. […] Let It Snow, Let Us Slow (Crockpot Steel-Cut Oatmeal) […]

    4. […] Let It Snow, Let Us Slow (Crockpot Steel-Cut Oatmeal) […]

    5. […] Let It Snow, Let Us Slow (Crockpot Steel-Cut Oatmeal) […]

    6. […] Let It Snow, Let Us Slow (Crockpot Steel-Cut Oatmeal) […]

    7. […] what you do, overnight crockpot oatmeal never turns out and is always overcooked or burned, try the Bain-Marie method (scroll down a bit to find the details) which is basically putting all the ingredients in a dish […]

    8. […] what you do, overnight crockpot oatmeal never turns out and is always overcooked or burned, try the Bain-Marie method (scroll down a bit to find the details) which is basically putting all the ingredients in a dish […]

    9. […] what you do, overnight crockpot oatmeal never turns out and is always overcooked or burned, try the Bain-Marie method (scroll down a bit to find the details) which is basically putting all the ingredients in a dish […]

    10. […] what you do, overnight crockpot oatmeal never turns out and is always overcooked or burned, try the Bain-Marie method (scroll down a bit to find the details) which is basically putting all the ingredients in a dish […]

    11. […] what you do, overnight crockpot oatmeal never turns out and is always overcooked or burned, try the Bain-Marie method (scroll down a bit to find the details) which is basically putting all the ingredients in a dish […]

    12. […] what you do, overnight crockpot oatmeal never turns out and is always overcooked or burned, try the Bain-Marie method (scroll down a bit to find the details) which is basically putting all the ingredients in a dish […]

    13. […] what you do, overnight crockpot oatmeal never turns out and is always overcooked or burned, try the Bain-Marie method (scroll down a bit to find the details) which is basically putting all the ingredients in a dish […]

    14. […] what you do, overnight crockpot oatmeal never turns out and is always overcooked or burned, try the Bain-Marie method (scroll down a bit to find the details) which is basically putting all the ingredients in a dish […]

    15. […] what you do, overnight crockpot oatmeal never turns out and is always overcooked or burned, try the Bain-Marie method (scroll down a bit to find the details) which is basically putting all the ingredients in a dish […]

    16. […] what you do, overnight crockpot oatmeal never turns out and is always overcooked or burned, try the Bain-Marie method (scroll down a bit to find the details) which is basically putting all the ingredients in a dish […]

    17. […] what you do, overnight crockpot oatmeal never turns out and is always overcooked or burned, try the Bain-Marie method (scroll down a bit to find the details) which is basically putting all the ingredients in a dish […]

    18. […] what you do, overnight crockpot oatmeal never turns out and is always overcooked or burned, try the Bain-Marie method (scroll down a bit to find the details) which is basically putting all the ingredients in a dish […]

    19. […] Crockpot Steel-Cut Oatmeal Jump to Comments Over a year ago, I posted a brief explanation (after forcing readers to suffer through the details of the Valentine’s D… but I’ve had so many conversations since then about the profound culinary pleasure of […]

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